The procrastinator’s guide to becoming a successful student.

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  1. Time management is key. If you start your assignments early, you won’t have to spend the last few nights before a deadline glued to your laptop, living off nothing but energy drinks and instant ramen.

    Deadline or not, I spend most nights glued to my laptop, living off nothing but energy drinks and instant ramen. Doing it because of school work makes it feel more purposeful.

  2. Keep a good balance. Make sure to equally pay attention to work/school, friends/family, nutrition, sleep and physical activity in your everyday life. You’ll be the most productive when all of these components play well together.

    Yes, if you give me one of those Kim Kardashian jobs where you just have to breathe and post some woke thoughts on twitter to get paid enough to end world hunger, I might consider living a balanced life. Today, I’m proud of myself for meal-prepping a banana and keeping my social media activity to only one self-depreciative post per week.

  3. Take a break. Invest in rest. You can only do so much.

    Honestly, this is not the issue here. Ever since Donna Meagle and Tom Haverford introduced me to the revolutionary lifestyle of “treat yourself” my outlooks on ever becoming a well-balanced, responsible adult have darkened immensely.

  4. Get input from your peers on how to study efficiently.

    I’m all for it! I love to get everyone’s opinion on how to live my life, because apparently I’m not doing a very good job by myself. You don’t want to know how many articles I’ve saved in my facebook, flipboard, iBooks, drive…tamagotchi(?!) about how to improve my way of work. If I ever get to reading those insightful pieces, I’ll be an unstoppable train of efficiency!

  5. Don’t be afraid to get help. You don’t have to manage everything by yourself.

    Sounds good, doesn’t work. The problem with being a procrastinating perfectionist is that you put off doing what you’re supposed to do until the last possible moment, only to panic if it doesn’t turn out as perfect as you’d pictured it in your head. Letting others take care of a few points on your to-do list ends in similar states of panic.